IMMEDIATE ACTION DRILLS (ACTIONS ON ENEMY CONTACT)

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Posted by: tire iron Apr 13 2007, 07:28 PM

This thread has been created to discuss the different methods teams use to deal with enemy contact.

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: PipeRain Apr 24 2007, 12:23 AM

Okay, here's what I know (which isn;t much) and believe to be right(which may well not be).

For simplicities sake, I'm gonna assume generally flat, dry ground (in other words you didn't just come off a beachhead at Dover or something odd like that) and its daylight. I'm also gonna ssume that the only weapons are semi-auto rifles and handguns, and no grenades, IED's, claymores, RPG's, bazooka's, M-79's, M-203's etc. In other words, what I have.

I'll start with a column formation, and front only contact.

Immediatly upon contact, the point man, or the first man not immediately rendered unable to fight, lays down suppressing fire in the direction of contact. If visible firing points are detected those should be targeted first. If multiple firing points are detected, the nearest, or the most destructive should be targeted. In other words, if you have a choice between a zombie with a .45 and a zombie with an RPG, focus on the zombie with the RPG; if weapons are generally similar, shoot the nearest zombie. Also, taking a knee might well not be a bad idea.

Once the first mans mag runs dry, moves aside, turns to the rear and runs to the nearest cover behind the team. While running he should be reloading so that when he reaches cover he can begin providing supporting fire. Magazine retention should be practiced, chances are, you'll need it in a bit. If possible, the turn should be done so as not to block the next mine from firing as soon as possible. In other words, if the point mans slack is primarily monitoring the left side of the column, the point man should turn to the right. Likewise, if the slack man is monitoring the right side, the point man should spin left.

As soon as the first man clears the firing lane, the second man in line then fires in the same manner as the first. Once his mag is emptied, he follows the first to cover in the same manner, and helps provide supporting fire for his team.

This continues until the entire team clears the ambush area and is in cover, returning fire.

If the team is moving in staggered column, the point and slack man would both fire initially, then turn and run down the center of the column, reloading as they go, until they reach cover. Then the next two men would commence firing, then retreat in the same fashion.

Variations :

If taken under fire while travelling in column, the team can split to staggerd colum formation, and return fire by twos and proceed as above. If they split, each man steps toward his area of responsibility. In other words, if you are covering left in column formation, step left. If you are covering right, step right.

If taken under fire while travelling in column, the point man can drop to a low knee position, and the slack man can fire over his head. If this is done, the point man is going to have to roll to the side be fore he rises, or risk standing up into a stream of fire.

I'd say before I post any more, we should find out what's right or wrong with this so far.

Posted by: tire iron Apr 24 2007, 12:26 PM

PR,

You did pretty dang good.

I just want to point out a few things.

The "Peel" - which is short for Australian Peel (which is the name of the first IA drill that PR discusses) - should only be done when lateral movement for the team is restricted - like on a jungle lane, or even a narrow alleyway. If lateral maneuvering is possible - there are better options than the Peel.

The team should come up with a SOP on which way everyone turns and runs when peeling from a column formation. Otherwise - confusion will be the result. When on a trail just have it be SOP that everyone turns to the left and runs down the left side of the team. Then turn that way EVERYTIME. That way one doesn't have to think about which way to turn when they are doing it for real. That short cuts the OODA loop to ACTION - instead of starting at the first O if it isn't SOP on which way to turn.

When in an alleyway/hallway - turn AWAY from the nearest wall and run down the center. This even works when the team is split and walking up opposite sides of an alleyway/hallway.

The whole goal of doing a detailed Mission Plan - is to get as many things down to the ACTION step of the OODA loop as you possible can. Remember - he who gets to the ACTION step of the OODA loop will win.

Carry on!

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: PipeRain Apr 25 2007, 07:28 PM

Thanks tire iron!

Points noted.

Okay, "And for my next trick...", contact from the side, close in.

If the patrol is taken under fire from either side, you have a couple options. Well, not including the "Lay down and die" option.

Option one : Get to cover, then return fire. If possible return fire in at least some manner while getting to cover. The chances that there will be cover that everyone can get to together will likely be pretty low. Therefore, the team will need to establish some manner of communication amongst themseves while in cover in order to effectively counter-attack or safely retreat.

Option two: Immediately upon the ambush being sprung, every team member turns toward the source of fire, opens fire, and charges the ambush. Optimally, the patrol will all assault the same spot in the ambush emplacement. The team should either follow predesignated individual, (ie the TL or ATL if the TL is down) or the fastest guy in the group, if the ambush emplacement if far enough away for anyone to get a lead on the others. The idea here is to do three things. 1) Re-take the "offensive" and break the attack 2) focus their fire on a single point to break through and 3) assault through the ambush emplacement, circle around and incapacitate or destroy the ambushers form the side or behind. If hte ambush is sprung "early" or "late' teh team can assault around the emplacement as well.

Personally, while I see the value of option two, I dislike the idea of frontal assaults on set emplacements. That's a good way to earn posthumous accolades.

If the team is taken under fire from a distance, hit the dirt and low crawl/high crawl out of the impact area, get to cover, set up a base of fire (if possible, this will depend on the range and direction of fire) and call the QRF.

Posted by: SuperD4K Apr 27 2007, 09:35 AM

Great information guys!

Posted by: tire iron Apr 27 2007, 05:30 PM

QUOTE (PR)
Option one : Get to cover, then return fire. If possible return fire in at least some manner while getting to cover. The chances that there will be cover that everyone can get to together will likely be pretty low. Therefore, the team will need to establish some manner of communication amongst themseves while in cover in order to effectively counter-attack or safely retreat.

Option two: Immediately upon the ambush being sprung, every team member turns toward the source of fire, opens fire, and charges the ambush. Optimally, the patrol will all assault the same spot in the ambush emplacement. The team should either follow predesignated individual, (ie the TL or ATL if the TL is down) or the fastest guy in the group, if the ambush emplacement if far enough away for anyone to get a lead on the others. The idea here is to do three things. 1) Re-take the "offensive" and break the attack 2) focus their fire on a single point to break through and 3) assault through the ambush emplacement, circle around and incapacitate or destroy the ambushers form the side or behind. If hte ambush is sprung "early" or "late' teh team can assault around the emplacement as well.

Personally, while I see the value of option two, I dislike the idea of frontal assaults on set emplacements. That's a good way to earn posthumous accolades.

If the team is taken under fire from a distance, hit the dirt and low crawl/high crawl out of the impact area, get to cover, set up a base of fire (if possible, this will depend on the range and direction of fire) and call the QRF.

The MOST important aspect of performing ANY of the above - is to SPLIT THE TEAM INTO "sub-teams". A six man team can be split into two 3 man teams - or three 2 man teams. I really like the three two man teams. It allows two different teams to fire on the enemy while the third team manuevers. So there is ALWAYS fire coming at the enemy from two different sources the whole time the team is manuevering away or toward the enemy.

This is all worked out through team SOP's and rehearsed until it is second nature.

Regarding close ambush right or left - I'm not a huge proponant of the team designating a point to break through. Having set many ambushes - I can tell you that the ambushee's could get through at almost any point besides the short leg (where the belt fed is situated). My advice is to run like a bat out of you know where to break through the ambush - yellling and firing - just make sure you aren't running into a belt fed. And you'll know if you are - there is no mistaking where the belt feds are - their noise is unlike anything else.

The reason one trys to go towards the enemy during an ambush - is the enemy - if they are worth thier salt - have emplaced all kinds of nasty booby-traps where they AREN'T. So if you run anywhere the enemy isn't - you may have to deal with worse things than enemy troops. Enemy troops can miss what they are firing at - especially if they are scared - whereas a claymore mine never misses.

Hope this helps,

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: PipeRain May 1 2007, 01:52 AM

Okay, I can see the value to "assaulting around/through" given that info.

So, the Home Team needs to setup their 2-man "Battle Buddies" before they ever leave the gate so that if they get in an ambush situation, they know where to go/what to do, and then run those IAD's until they are in fact "Immediate" upon "Action".

My questions then are these; we've at least sorta covered coming under fire/ambush from front and sides, what about from the rear? Is the action taken different if its an "Off the cuff" attack from your basic opportunistic brigands as opposed to a set ambush?

Posted by: tire iron May 1 2007, 05:58 PM

Recieving enemy fire SUCKS.

Here is what goes through my mind - all at faster than light speed.

1. Is this a coordinated effort - or are they just as surprised as we are that they found us?

2. If we decide it is best to break contact and run away - are we doing exactly what they want and are actually running into another - stronger -deadlier ambush (trap)??

3, If we assault them - are we certain they are not the lead element of a much larger, stronger force?

Alot of it is being able to process billiions of bits of information in micro-seconds. Things like - are they moving while they are shooting?? (You surprised each other - they weren't set in an ambush position.) If you can't even see where the fire is coming from except by sound and some muzzle flash - odds are it is a set ambush - as they are in thier positions.

It is almost always better to break contact - as you never know what numbers of men they have that you can't see - especially if you are in a six man team.

Does this help?

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: ScottFN308 May 1 2007, 09:23 PM

QUOTE (tire iron @ May 1 2007, 05:58 PM) *
Recieving enemy fire SUCKS.

Here is what goes through my mind - all at faster than light speed.

1. Is this a coordinated effort - or are they just as surprised as we are that they found us?

2. If we decide it is best to break contact and run away - are we doing exactly what they want and are actually running into another - stronger -deadlier ambush (trap)??

3, If we assault them - are we certain they are not the lead element of a much larger, stronger force?
Alot of it is being able to process billiions of bits of information in micro-seconds. Things like - are they moving while they are shooting?? (You surprised each other - they weren't set in an ambush position.) If you can't even see where the fire is coming from except by sound and some muzzle flash - odds are it is a set ambush - as they are in thier positions.

It is almost always better to break contact - as you never know what numbers of men they have that you can't see - especially if you are in a six man team.

Does this help?

cheers

tire iron

It does help me, as this is how I train.

Thanks TI.

Posted by: Pilgrim May 1 2007, 10:12 PM

OK, so if we are attacked from the rear, and the contact appears to be not premeditated, the best option is to 'protect ourselves', and continue on our way?

Remember, I need things spelled out in simple terms.

I'm still a just a dumb-ass MP that does what I'm told.... well a little wiser I hope, I hang out here don't I...

Posted by: tire iron May 1 2007, 11:49 PM

Pilgrim,

Right on - no problem.

Here is the rule of thumb I go by with a six-to-eight man team.

For DEFENSIVE F&M - I split the team into two teams - cause you can all get out of dodge quicker that way - as two teams can leap-frog faster than three teams.

For OFFENSIVE F&M - I like to split the patrol into three teams. The enemy has too many teams to track - and it ALWAYS receiving covering fire the whole time too.

Does this help?

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: Romanknight May 7 2007, 04:46 PM

QUOTE (tire iron @ Apr 27 2007, 04:30 PM) *
The MOST important aspect of performing ANY of the above - is to SPLIT THE TEAM INTO "sub-teams". A six man team can be split into two 3 man teams - or three 2 man teams. I really like the three two man teams. It allows two different teams to fire on the enemy while the third team manuevers. So there is ALWAYS fire coming at the enemy from two different sources the whole time the team is manuevering away or toward the enemy.

This is all worked out through team SOP's and rehearsed until it is second nature.

Regarding close ambush right or left - I'm not a huge proponant of the team designating a point to break through. Having set many ambushes - I can tell you that the ambushee's could get through at almost any point besides the short leg (where the belt fed is situated). My advice is to run like a bat out of you know where to break through the ambush - yellling and firing - just make sure you aren't running into a belt fed. And you'll know if you are - there is no mistaking where the belt feds are - their noise is unlike anything else.

The reason one trys to go towards the enemy during an ambush - is the enemy - if they are worth thier salt - have emplaced all kinds of nasty booby-traps where they AREN'T. So if you run anywhere the enemy isn't - you may have to deal with worse things than enemy troops. Enemy troops can miss what they are firing at - especially if they are scared - whereas a claymore mine never misses.

Hope this helps,

cheers

tire iron

According to Gunny Poole, some commo wire or tangle foot wire in the grass, plus a few claymores, right in front of the enemy position, will make frontal attacks much less desirable. How do you deal with that?

Posted by: tire iron May 7 2007, 06:20 PM

For one - being caught in an ambush is a very bad place to be. If the enemy knows what it is doing - you will in all probability die.

They (the enemy) will try to entangle you as you assault them.

They will entangle AND booby-trap you if you try and run away from them.

They will shoot you if you try to stay.

If they know how to set a truely effective ambush - you don't HAVE any good options. You get to choose one of three very bad choices.

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: ROWSCO May 7 2007, 11:21 PM

I apologize ahead of time for not posting in tactics much. I kind of left that to others but as it is one of my last posts I figured I would lend some experience to the matter.

Hasty Ambush you have a chance ...

Deliberate Ambush you were in the kill zone 30 seconds to 1 minute before you knew it...

And it would take you that same amount of time to get out of it "if " they didnt fire. Deliberate ambushes take into account all possible known enemy SOP's and Incorporate that into the near side and far side security.
The best SOP To date when dealing with tactics as such is to Be prepared for the possibility of an ambush ahead of time BY:

1. Map and Terrain analysis

2. Use of OCOKA and Avoidance or reduction of terrain use that is supportive of ambushes.

3. Use of Captured or native Intelligence

4. Knowledge of Enemy T.T.P.'s and History of activity in the Area

5. A definite Counter Ambush SOP and Security Element

And add the following to the SOP of either the Security element or your Point, Slack Trail, and 6 man.

When we would Recce or Patrol the Point-man Would Carry a Smoke with no pin and so would the Trail and 6. Upon Contact Smoke is thrown towards the enemy but between you and the enemy. Break contact IAW SOP then Di Di Mao to the last rally point two terrain features back. Set up Security 360 wait for 20 to 30 minutes then prepare for movement to contact. As the Ambush team is now up and moving. Either towards you or towards their OP/CP/TOC/RP. Maintain Radio silence unless your SOP demands a SITREP to higher or you have to initiate your 5 point contingency plan, due to mission essential personnel or equipment lost during initial enemy contact.

Worked well for us. and it was real bullets and a real enemy ...

Oh and trim the Fuses in the Smoke so there is no delay between Spoon flip and cook off... Kinda important. Any old bravo can show you how to do that.

Real Trust is built one Firefight at a time... Me..

Posted by: Pilgrim May 8 2007, 03:47 PM

ROWSCO when you say "5 Point Contingency Plan", do you mean this....

I. SITUATION

A. Country Climatic Zones

1. Tropical Rainy Climate

2. Dry Climate

3. Temperate Climate

4. Cold Climate (wet/dry)

5. Polar

B. Climatic Land Zones (whatever is applicable)

1. Coasts - Seasons

a. Temperature

b. Precipitation

c. General wind direction

d. Cloud cover

2. Plains (refer to coasts)

3. Deserts (refer to coasts)

4. Plateaus (refer to coasts)

5. Mountains (refer to coasts)

6. Swamps (refer to coasts)

C. Light Data (BMNT, EENT, Moonrise, Moonset, Percent of Illumination)

D. Terrain

1. Neighboring Borders

2. General Terrain Zones

a. Coasts

(1) General description and size

(2) Vegetation

(a) Natural

1. Tundra

2. Coniferous forest

3. Deciduous forest

4. Temperate grassland

5. Marshland swamp

6. Desert

7. Pastoral and arable land

8. Tropical forest

9. Savanna

(b) Cultivated

Concealment (density)

(d) Growing seasons

(e) Edible

1. Food value

2. Procurement (young or mature)

3. Preparation

4. Cooking

(f) Poisonous

(g) Medical use

(h) Other uses

(3)Animals and fish

(a) Domestic

1. Food values

2. Procurement

3. Preparation

4. Cooking

5. Medical use

6. Dangerous

7. Poisonous

8. Other uses

(b) Wildlife (animals, fish, insects, and reptiles) (see domestic)

(4)Water sources

(a) Procurement

(b) Potability

Preparation

b. Plains (refer to coasts)

c. Deserts (refer to coasts)

d. Plateaus (refer to coasts)

e. Mountains (refer to coasts)

f. Swamps (refer to coasts)

g. Rivers and lakes (refer to coasts)

3. Natural Land Barriers

a. Mountain ranges

b. Large rivers

E. Civilian Population

1. Numbers of Population

a. Totals and density (by areas)

b. Divisions of urban, suburban, rural, and nomads

2. Dress and Customs

3. Internal Security Forces

4. Controls and Restrictions (explain)

5. Border Area Security

F. Friendly Forces

1. FEBA/FLOT

2. Closest Units

3. Location of Friendly or Neutral Embassies, Liaisons, Consulates, etc.

4. Recovery Sites (explain), LZs En Route.

G. Enemy Forces

1. Doctrine

2. Tactics

3. Intelligence Reports

a. Identification

b. Location

c. Activity

d. Strength

e. Night sighting devices

II. MISSION--Conduct Avoidance of Capture on Order From-To

III. EXECUTION

A. Overall Plan

1. When Do You Initiate Movement?

2. Location of Initial Movement Point

3. Actions at Initial Movement Point

4. Location of Hide Areas

5. Movement to Hide Areas

6. Actions Around the Hide Sites

7. Movement to Hide Sites

8. Actions at Hide Sites

a. Construction

b. Occupation

c. Movement out of hide site

9. Location of Hole-up Areas

10. Actions at Hole-up Areas

11. Location of Recovery Site(s)

B. Other Missions

1. Movement

a. Formation

b. Individual positions

c. Navigation

d. Stealth/listening

e. Security

(1) Noise

(2) Light

(3) All around security

f. Cover, concealment, and camouflage

g. Actions at breaks

(1) Listening (5-10 minutes)

(2) Long

h. Actions at danger areas (enemy observation or fire)

i. Actions for enemy sighting/contact

j. Rally points/rendezvous points

(1) Locations

(2) Actions

2. Actions in the Care of Sick or Injured

a. Initial movement point

b. Along the movement route

3. Actions for Crossing Borders

4. Actions at Recovery Site(s)

5. Other Actions

6. Training and Rehearsals

7. Inspections before starting movement

IV. SERVICE AND SUPPORT

A. Survival Aids

1. Health

a. First aid

b. Disease

2. Water

a. Procurement

b. Purification

c. Carrying

3. Food

a. Procurement

b. Preparation

c. Cooking

d. Carrying

4. Shelter and Comfort/Warmth

5. Fire Starting

6. Recovery

7. Travel

B. Survival Kit(s)

C. Special Equipment

D. Inspections

1. Responsibilities

2. Equipment, Survival Items, and Kit(s)

V. COMMAND AND SIGNAL

A. Chain of Command

1. Senior Person

2. Team Leader

B. Signals To Be Used by Movement Teams

1. Along the Route

2. Rally/Rendezvous Points

C. Communications to Higher Headquarters (radio)

If so then I might just be catching on.....

Posted by: ROWSCO May 8 2007, 11:35 PM

I am referring to this

Who is Missing?

Where are we at? Grid and or Phase line?

Who is in charge now ?

What do we need to accomplish the Mission and do we have it?

Can we still accomplish the mission? and if so how has our oplan changed due to this contact?

This is a Mission Control which is briefed to all on the mission as a final appendix to the 5 paragraph OPORD or SMEAC

Posted by: SuperD4K May 21 2007, 01:27 AM

Great info guys!

Posted by: PipeRain May 23 2007, 12:35 AM

At our FTX this last weekend (THe AAR of which we are still working on) we decided that for "Contact Rear", since our drag is already facing nearly, or completely, rearward we will simply perform the "Aussie peel", but from back to front. The guy who was point, now essentialy becomes "Drag/Point" and has to be both keeping an eye out towrad the contact and also be thinking of a way to point what used to be the "drag" to head for for a defensible position; and everyone gathers there.

Posted by: tire iron May 23 2007, 07:24 PM

That is SOP for most teams. Good job.

cheers

tire iron

Posted by: PipeRain May 23 2007, 07:47 PM

Well, it just seemed like it made sense.

I guess even a blind hog can find an acorn now and again eh? banana.gif

Posted by: PipeRain Jun 6 2007, 08:51 PM

Is there more we need to do here?

Do the principles of "contact" change if they attackers are mounted vs. ground pounders?

I really don't want to see this die on the vine.

Posted by: Romanknight Dec 13 2007, 02:34 PM

Does this work in MOUT as well? Although, after six months of TEOTWAWKI, the urban streets will be like Beirut in the 80's, or Escape from New York!
WHat's the SOP for movement through urban terrain?

Posted by: PipeRain Dec 13 2007, 05:13 PM

I can't speak for ti, but from my understanding MOUT per se is a whole 'nother can o' worms. H. John Pooles "The Last 100 Yards" has an excellent section on MOUT I just finished. Essentailly the rpinciples of "Contact" remain the same, but if you truly get ambushed by an emplaced OPFOR, you're likely not going to survive.

Posted by: tire iron Dec 14 2007, 10:14 AM

PR is right - if you are sucked into an ambush - set up by pro's - you're dead.

cheers

tire iron

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