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FOOD - BACK COUNTRY COOKING INFORMATION AND RECIPIES

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More recipies and cooking information

Here is one of the sites that I visit and that some of the information that I posted below came from. 

This website is called trailcooking.com. Enjoy it!

All of the information contained on this page comes from various sources on the internet. 
 
Bannock has been a staple food of wilderness explorers, prospectors, soldiers and trappers for centuries.  Portable, nutritious, tasty and easy to make while surviving in the outdoors, bannocks legendary reputation continues as one of the best survival foods you can bring into the wilderness.  Bannock is high in carbohydrates and complements the proteins of Pemmican, Jerky, the Arctic Survival Ration, and other meats.  It can be used as a hearty stand-alone food or combined with foraged wild edibles such as berries, fruits, and meats.
 

What is Bannock?

Bannock is bread that you can cook using little more than a fire and a stick though it can also be baked or fried. Names for bannock include bushbread, trail bread, grease bread and galette.

Bannocks origins are lost in the mists of time, but some believe bannock was first made by the Scotts from the same oat flour that gave their horses great strength and endurance. With stomachs fed with hearty oat bannock those who became explorers and mountain men in the new world introduced the bannock recipe to the Native Americans and other outdoorsmen who lived in the wilderness.

 

Bannock

The most simple bannock recipe consists of just flour of nearly any kind and water. Kneaded into dough and wrapped around a green stick, this most basic bannock cooks into a fine tasting bread that can be eaten alone or used as a basis for a full course meal.

There are a great many other bannock recipes that will make your mouth water and give you the impetus to try your hand at making your own. 

 

Survival Topics Bannock on a Green Stick

This is my favorite way to make bannock as it brings forth the image of mountainmen from a bygone era cooking over an open fire.

 

The following recipe provides enough Bannock for one day.  Stored in a waterproof bag, it is easy to carry a week or ten day supply. 

1-cup whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons milk powder

Mix all the ingredients well, making sure the butter is evenly distributed throughout. Sometimes I will melt the butter before adding it to the mixture. Then slowly add water while mixing until a dough ball is formed. 

 

Cooking Bannock

Make the bannock dough into a cigar shape and wrap it around a green stick. Try to keep the thickness of the dough about ½ inch.

Slowly roast the bannock over a hot fire, rotating occasionally until it turns a golden brown. You will hear the butter sizzling and your stomach rumble as the bannock cooks.

 

Multi-flour Bannock Recipe

This combination of flours, spices, and dried fruit makes the bannock a delicious meal of itself and makes me hungry just thinking about it. It can be cooked over an open fire on a green stick or formed into a loaf and baked and makes a 3-day supply:

1 Cup Barley flour
1 Cup Wheat flour
1/2 Cup Rolled Oats
1 Cup White Sugar
1/2 to 1 Cup Raisins or other dried fruit
1 1/2 Cup Buttermilk
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 tbsp. Coarse Ground Salt
1 tbsp. Cinnamon
1 tbsp. Cloves
1 tbsp. Nutmeg

 

Fried Bannock

If you like fried foods then you need to try fried Bannock.

4 cups flour
2 tbsp baking powder
2 tbsp sugar
1/2 cup milk

1/4 cup margarine/butter
2 eggs
1/4 tbsp salt

Mix all the ingredients so a dough ball is formed. Break off pieces and flatten into rounds about ½ inch thick. Fry to a golden brown in the oil of your choice.

 

Try Making Bannock

Bannock is a fulfilling meal that can be used to supplement natural foods foraged from your surroundings. When hiking in the wilderness I like to have enough pre-mixed bannock recipe for at least one meal each day.

 

Try out various combinations of bannock mixed with fruits, nuts and seeds, cheeses, meats, fish and a variety of spices. Wilderness meals containing bannock can satisfy even the most discriminating palate.

 

Bannock is easy to cook and is an excellent comfort food that will elevate your mood and fill your stomach. There is nothing quite like the sight and smell of fresh bannock cooking over an open fire at the end of a hard day surviving in the wilderness.

SOUPS & STEWS

NEW ENGLAND HADDOCK CHOWDER

  • ¼ pound salt pork, cubed
  • 4 cups diced raw potato
  • 3 pounds fresh skinned haddock bones in.
  • 3 onions, sliced
  • 2 cups whole milk, scalded
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 teaspoon salt and
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper.
  1. Fry the salt pork out in the pot in which the chowder is to be made.
  2. Remove fried pork
  3. Put into the pot the onions, potatoes and half the salt.
  4. Cover with hot water and cook until potatoes are tender, but not broken.
  5. Cut the fish into three pieces, and in a separate dish, simmer it in boiling water to which the remaining ½ tsp. salt has been added (So that the fish won't break)
  6. Then put: fish and strained fish stock (for flavor) into heated chowder dish. Add milk,.
  7. Butter, and pepper. Season.
  8. This serves five.

COLONY CORN CHOWDER

  • 6 large soda crackers or biscuits       
  • 1 cup milk   
  • ¼ lb salt pork
  • 1 good large onion, sliced
  • 4 large potatoes, pared, sliced
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups of corn cut whole from the cob
  • 1 ¼ tsps salt    
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  1. Soak crackers or biscuits in sweet milk.
  2. Cut salt pork into cubes and brown over medium fire
  3. Add onion and cook until soft.
  4. Add potatoes and water, then cook until potatoes are soft but not all broken
  5. Stir in the cracker-milk mixture, corn, salt, and paprika
  6. Heat all through
  7. Serve piping hot
  8. Serves 8 people

POTATO STEW

  1. Pare and slice one quart of potatoes;
  2. Put on two slices of salt pork; fry nice and brown,
  3. Add one onion chopped fine,
  4. And one tablespoon flour; stir well to prevent burning.
  5. Add one quart boiling water and potatoes
  6. Boil until soft then add one cup rich milk and one-half dozen large (may be stale) soda crackers.  
  7. One large spoonful butter may be added.

MULLIGAN STEW (Very old recipe)

  1. 1/2 cup each of diced onions, carrots, celery, and turnip;
  2. 4 potatoes quartered;
  3. Add to 1/8 lb salt pork,
  4. 2 pounds venison, lamb or beef cut in small pieces and cooked 1 hour in 1 pint of water 1 teaspoon salt and ¼ tsp. Pepper
  5. Cook all together for one hour
  6. Dumplings to taste may be added last 12 minutes.

ENGLISH STEW (Made with beef instead of the mutton in Irish Stew)

  • 2 pounds top round beef       
  • 1 large onion, sliced  
  • 2 tsps. salt
  • 1/8 tsps. pepper   
  • 2 carrots, diced,    
  • 4 potatoes, pared, sliced
  • 3 slices yellow turnip     
  • 4 tbs. flour.
  1. Wipe the beef and cut into small pieces.
  2. Roll the pieces of beef in flour and sear in the fat.  
  3. Place meat in pot with onion, salt and pepper.
  4. Cover with about 2 quarts cold water and simmer until the meat is tender.
  5. Add carrots, potatoes and turnip,
  6. Wet flour with cold water to form a paste,
  7. Add to stew and let simmer until slightly thickened.
  8. At this point, care is needed so that the stew does not burn.
  9. Bring to the boiling point and serve. Flour paste need not be used.
  10. At last minute instead of paste drop thoroughly washed beet, celery, or collard greens on unthickened mixture to add color and vitamins

PLYMOUTH SUCCOTASH

  • 1 quart large white Navy beans
  • 6 quarts hulled corn (Smutty white)
  • 6-8 pounds of corned beef (2nd cut rattle rand).     
  • 1 pd. Salt Pork both fat and lean.
  • 4-6 pds. chicken cleaned and trussed.
  • 1 large turnip
  • 8-10 medium sized potatoes
  • salt and pepper to season.
  1. Soak beans overnight
  2. In the morning simmer until soft, and mash to a pulp.
  3. Place pork and corned beef in cold water to cover, gradually bring to a slow boil: continue until tender, about 3 hours
  4. Boil the chicken in another kettle about 1 and 1/2 hours, or until tender.
  5. Place the mashed beans and hulled corn in a kettle with some fat and liquor from the cooked meats.   
  6. Simmer to the consistency of a thick soup. The beans should absorb the liquor but not become too dry.
  7. Remove the meats to a warm platter to be served with succotash.
  8. Mix the corned beef and chicken liquors and in this cook the turnip and potatoes cut in small pieces.
  9. Now add the hulled corn and beans to the cooked vegetables and juices as for a stew, and simmer a few minutes to blend the flavors.
  10. Serve the succotash in bowls and pass the meats to be added or to be eaten on the side as desired.

RED FLANNEL HASH

  • 2 cups cold cooked, meat     
  • 2 1/2 cups potatoes (cooked)   
  • 3/4 cup turnip (cooked)
  • 3/4 cup cooked carrots     
  • 1 cup cooked cabbage        
  • 1 cup cooked beets 1/2 cup raw onions warmed in 2 tbs butter
  • 1/4 tsp pepper,
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 4 teaspoons garlic vinegar
  1. Dice vegetables and combine all ingredients in a black oven frying pan;
  2. pour over all the 1/4 cup of water.
  3. Cover and let cook slowly
  4. Stir occasionally until thoroughly heated and flavors are blended.
  5. Serve hot

HEARTY ENTREES

CHICKEN ROLY-POLY    (A very old recipe)

  • One quart of flour
  • two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar mixed with the flour
  • one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in
  • a teacupful of milk
  • a teaspoonful of salt;
  • (do not use shortening of any kind)
  1. Roll out the mixture half an inch thick,
  2. lay minced chicken, veal, or mutton onto rolled batter.
  3. The meat must be seasoned with pepper and always salt and be free from gristle.
  4. Roll the crust over and over and put it on a buttered plate and place in a steamer for half an hour.
  5. Serve with gravy over each slice.

HAUNCH OF VENISON ROASTED

  • 12 pounds roast
  • Salt, pepper and flour dredge   
  • 4 cups flour
  • 2 cups water     
  • 1 tablespoon currant jelly.
  1. Wipe meat carefully with wet cloth and cover with a large sheet of buttered paper.
  2. Make a thick paste of flour and water, roll our 3/4 inch thick and lay over the fat side of the haunch.
  3. Cover with three or four sheets of white paper and tie Securely with cord
  4. Put in dripping pan and roast and do not .forget to baste often to prevent paper and string from burning.
  5. A twelve pound haunch will take 3 hours to roast.
  6. Half an hour before it is done remove from the oven cut strings, take off paste, and paper;
  7. Dredge with flour, salt, and pepper
  8. return to oven and roast to fine brown color
  9. Serve with a brown sauce to which a tbs. currant jelly is added

ROAST VENISON--Alternate Recipe

  • 6 to 8 pounds roast of venison    
  • 6 strips bacon  
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cups tomato soup
  • flour, salt, pepper
  1. Wipe venison with vinegar-soaked cloth. Never use water as this t-ends to toughen meat fibers. Vinegar picks up hairs and clotted blood more readily.
  2. Dredge with flour that has been salted and peppered.
  3. Lard by laying strips of bacon across fastened with toothpicks. Throw rings of onion over each toothpick, 3 to a strip of bacon
  4. Start in a brisk oven at 500 degrees for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 300 and roast 20 minutes to the pound. 45 minutes before serving pour tomato soup over entire roast
  5. Cover and put back in oven.   This will make a most delicious sauce or gravy. Time in oven varies according to age of deer.

YANKEE CODFISH IN GRAVY

  1. Break salt fish into pieces, cover with cold water and bring slowly to simmering point, but don't boil.
  2. Drain, and repeat 2 more times using cold water and bringing to simmering point until fish is tender enough to suit you.
  3. Boiled fish is tough so be careful.
  4. Place fish on large platter and pour gravy over it.
  5. Serve piping hot with hot baked potatoes and buttered or pickled beets

To make rich white sauce —

  1. Blend 2 tbs. butter with 2 tbs. flour
  2. Add 1 cup sweet milk and cook until thick, stirring all the time
  3. Stir in a slightly beaten egg (or boiled sliced eggs) and seasoning to taste..

BREADS and DESSERTS

FLUMMERY

This is actually a blanc-mange pudding with a sea moss base.  Sea moss has always been valued for its curative and vitamin powers.  Earlier variation was called PAP when using oatmeal in place of sea moss, but not as palatable.

  • 1 quart milk
  • 3 tbs sugar
  • 1 tbs sea moss farina
  • 1 tsp, vanilla
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  1. Put milk in double boiler and sprinkle sea moss into it, stirring well all the time
  2. Heat slowly & stir often
  3. When it boils up and looks white, add sugar, salt and flavoring.
  4. Strain and turn into mold which has been dipped in cold water.
  5. Takes 3 hours to harden.
  6. Serve topped with cream and sugar, or fresh fruit.

HASTY PUDDING - (Actually a corn meal mush)

Original recipe text:    Put two quarts of water into a clean dinner pot or saucepan, cover it and let it become boiling hot over the fire; then add a tablespoonful of salt, take off the light scum from the top, have secured to use some sweet fresh yellow or white corn meal.  Take a handful of the meal with the left hand, and a pudding stick in the right, then with the stick stir the water around and by degrees let fall the meal; when one handful is exhausted, refill it; continue to stir and add meal until it is as thick as you can stir easily, or until the stick: will stand in it; stir it awhile longer; let the fire be gentle; when it is sufficiently cooked, which will be in half on hour, it will bubble or puff. up; turn it into a deep basin. This is good eaten cold or hot, with milk or with butter and syrup or sugar, or with meat and gravy, the same as potatoes or rice. Hasty Pudding was often served for Sunday night suppers with stripped salt codfish on the side.

Fried Hasty Pudding is made the same way and then chilled in bread tins until of slicing consistency, dipped by slice in flour and fried in lard or butter until well browned on both sides. Serve hot topped with butter and syrup, honey, or fresh fruit jam.

 

Modern Recipe: Refer to side panel of corn meal box

 

INDIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING

  • 1/4 cup pearl tapioca soaked overnight in 1 cup of milk and then added to 3 cups of milk and entire mixture scalded.
  • Blend 4 tbs corn meal
  • 1/2 cup light molasses
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (or white)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  1. Add to the hot milk and cook until it begins to thicken
  2. Place into a well-greased baking dish (use butter for greasing)
  3. Bake l hour in slow oven of 325 degrees
  4. then stir in 1 cup top milk or thin cream
  5. reduce temp to about 275, continue baking for 2 more hours
  6. We still serve this with hard sauce, not ice cream

MOLASSES DOUGHNUTS

  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup sour milk        
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. Soda
  • 1/2 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 cups flour or just enough to handle easily
  1. Fry in hot fat (380). Turn once.
  2. Makes about 2 dozen donuts.

1776 MOLASSES DUMPLINGS

  • 2 cups. flour            
  • 2 tsp fat             
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsps. cream tartar     
  • 1 tsp. soda     
  • 3/4 cup milk.
  1. Mix-dumplings and roll to one inch thickness. Cut with small cutter.
  2. Drop 2 or 3 at a time in hot fat.
  3. Have ready another kettle of boiling molasses, as soon as fried, drop into boiling molasses
  4. Remove and drain.

MUSTER GINGERBREAD

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp. Soda
  • 1/2 cup shortening (chicken fat preferred)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 egg beaten
  • l tsp. Ginger
  • 1 cup molasses
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 3 cups sifted pastry flour
  • 1/2 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  1. Heat oven with control set for moderate oven ~ 350 degrees.
  2. Butter and flour two pans 10x7 or 8" square if thicker loaf is desired.
  3. Mix and sift flour, soda, salt and spices.
  4. Cream shortening and sugar
  5. add molasses and beaten egg.
  6. Stir in dry ingredients.
  7. Slowly add boiling water.
  8. Turn into prepared pans.
  9. Bake until it comes away from the sides of the pan, requires about 25-30 minutes.
  10. It should be slightly and evenly rounded over the top, never cracked open.

PROVIDENCE CAKE

  • 1 cup butter                     
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups sugar               
  • ½ pint milk
  • 3 cups flour                
  • 1 pint raisins
  • ½ tsp each nutmeg, cloves, saleratus
  1. Heat oven to 325-350 degrees.
  2. Butter loaf pan, probably 8"x4"x4".
  3. Sift flour, salt, and spices along with soda, cream butter and sugar until fluffy.
  4. Add in beaten eggs and beat well.
  5. Add flour, to which raisins have been added-just a little at a time, beating well after each addition.
  6. When all the flour has been added, beat the entire batter until smooth and velvety.
  7.  Turn into prepared pan and bake 60 to 75 minutes

SQUASH MUFFINS

  • 2½ cups sifted flour                  
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt                          
  • 1 cup sweet milk
  • 1½ teasp. baking powder             
  • 1 cup squash
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar              
  • 1 tablespoon melted butter
  • ½ cup sugar
  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Line 1-2 muffin pans. .
  3. Sift flour, salt, cream of tartar and baking powder.
  4. Add soda to milk.
  5. Mix squash, butter and sugar.
  6. Add in milk soda mix.
  7. Mix well.
  8. Add flour all at once and stir just until dampened.
  9. Turn into pans and bake 20 minutes.
  10. Best served with fresh Jam

SWAMP YANKEE APPLESAUCE CAKE

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Cloves
  • 1/4 tsp. Nutmeg
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1 tsp soda, dissolved in warm water
  • 1 cup cooked applesauce
  • 1-3/4 cups sifted flour.
  1. Heat oven with control set at 350 degrees for moderate oven.
  2. Butter loaf pan - a bread pan is good.   
  3. Cream sugar and shortening.
  4. Add salt, cloves, nutmeg and raisins.
  5. Add soda that has been dissolved in warm water, and stir in the applesauce.
  6. Beat until well mixed.
  7. Then add floor
  8. Bake in loaf pan 350 degrees for 45 minutes.
  9. Cover with white frosting as desired
  10. Is also good just pan plain with a glass of cold milk.

SYLLABUB (Soft custard pudding)

Syllabub is also classified as a rich eggnog type of drink to which brandy may be added, and often served with tea cakes

  • 4 egg yolks                  
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 tablespoon flour    
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla 
  • 3/4 cup sugar       
  • 1 pint whipped cream
  • Brandy or wine
  1. Mix half sugar with flour
  2. Bring milk to boil and add sugar and flour.
  3. Cook in double boiler 10 minutes.
  4. Beat egg yolks, add in other half sugar, and finally add this to milk mixture, stirring slowly.
  5. Cook 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
  6. Remove from fire and add vanilla.
  7. Let mixture cool.
  8. When serving fill a tumbler half full of this custard
  9. Add a  thin layer of brandy or wine on top of custard
  10. Finish filling with the chilled whipped cream.
  11. Often served with tea cakes on festive occasions

Recipes from Colonial Times

Eager to know about cooking and foods in the Colonial times? Well, here are some easy-to-make recipes from the Colonial times.

 

Lifestyle in the Colonial times was different from what we do today. Food, for instance, was prepared using a cooking style quite unlike that of today. The Colonial people used the same knife that they used for cutting the wood to cut vegetables and meat. It took quite a long time for cooking, and there were no grocery shops. Cheese and butter were made at home. People in the Colonial times loved corn. They also ate lots of vegetables and fruits. People living by the sea used to eat clams, lobsters and other seafood. They used to drink milk, beer and cider made from apples and pears. In Colonial times, recipes were known as receipts. Flavoring in Colonial baking included rose water, molasses, coconut, almonds, lemon and Caraway seeds. Spices were dried by the fire, then powdered and sifted before use. Take a look at some delightful food recipes from the Colonial times, and try them out this weekend.

Hobnails

Ingredients
1½ Cup sifted flour
1 Egg, beaten
½ Cup shortening
1 Cup light brown sugar
½ Cup raisins
½ Tsp baking soda
1 Tsp cinnamon
1 Tsp vanilla
½ Tsp salt

Preparation
In a small mixing bowl, cream together shortening and sugar. Then add vanilla and beaten egg. Sift together all the dry ingredients and mix them well. Then, add raisins. Prepare small balls of the mixture. Place them on greased cookie sheet and bake for about 12-15 minutes at 375°F.

Colonial Brown Sugar Cookies

Ingredients
2 Cups flour
1 Cup shortening
1 Cup brown sugar
½ Cup sour cream
1 Egg
2 Tsp baking powder
½-1 Cup raisins
½-1 Cup nuts, chopped
½ Tsp nutmeg
½ Tsp soda
½ Tsp salt

Preparation
In a large bowl, mix together shortening, sugar, nutmeg, egg and salt. Then add flour, sour cream, baking powder and soda. Mix it well. Then, add nuts and raisins in this mixture. Drop a spoonful of mixture, one at a time, onto a greased baking sheet, and bake at 325°F for about 12-15 minutes.

Colonial Stew

Ingredients
1 Lb beef
2 Potatoes
10 Tomatoes
6 Carrots
1 Cup of peas
1 Cup of corn
1 Cup of beans
5 Celery stalks
5 Cups water
5 Cloves garlic, minced
Pepper and salt to taste

Preparation
Brown the beef. In a soup pot, mix together all vegetables. Then add salt and pepper to taste. Add water. Then add meat, reduce the heat. Allow it to simmer over low heat for about one hour.

Applejacks

Ingredients
1 Cup light brown sugar
1 Cup chopped, unpeeled apples
½ Cup shortening
1-1/3 Cup sifted flour
1 Egg
1 Tsp nutmeg
½ Tsp baking soda
½ Tsp salt

Preparation
In a mixing bowl, combine together shortening and sugar. Then, add beaten egg. Sift together the dry ingredients and add to the mixture. Beat it, until mixed well. Then add chopped apples to this mixture. Shape the mixture in small balls and drop these balls onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake them for about 12-15 minutes at 375°F.

Freezer Bag Cooking 101

When we started developing recipes for outdoor cooking nearly everything for the first couple years were for the method called Freezer Bag Cooking or also known as FBC. When asked "What is FBC?" the answer is it is making your own meals, just the way you want.

Consider them to be similar to commercial freeze dried meals but without the cost and you can customize them exactly to how you want!

How to do FBC:

Most people who do the FBC method will package their meals at home before the trip. You will want to note on each bag what the meal is and how much water is required. Some will tuck a tiny note inside, others use a permanent marker on the outside.

When getting ready to “cook” your meal, bring your water to a near boil. Pour the water into your cup to measure, then add it to your freezer bag. This way you avoid the chance of burns, adding too much water, or touching your freezer bag with a burning hot piece of metal - and having the small potential of melting the bag. You DO NOT need boiling water to rehydrate meals! Boiling is at 212°, 180° water will work just fine. If you need to boil your water to remove any chance of water born pathogens let it cool for a couple minutes and then proceed.

Stir with a long handled metal, wooden or heat safe plastic spoon. After you have mixed it well, zip up the bag tightly and wrap in a fleece hat, jacket or cozy made for the purpose. Then let sit for 5 to 15 minutes (the recipe and altitude will determine how long), make yourself a drink and wait for your meal. Once ready, stir well and eat. We usually put our freezer bag into our cozies before we add the water (since we use a dedicated cozy), this works well as we don't have to hold the bag upright while the water is added.

A Note On Squeezing/Kneading Bags:
If you squeeze or knead your bags to mix up the food, be very careful- be sure you have pushed out all the air before you do this. The steam from the hot liquid can cause a build up and your kneading could cause the bag to pop open. For items like mashed potatoes and stuffing kneading if done carefully works well.

The "How Do I Eat Out Of The Bag?" question:
This can take a little practice, but after your food is ready, roll the top 1/3 of the bag down (imagine you are cuffing socks). This will make your bag into its own bowl. If eating soup or chowders, be careful. You can also witha sharp camp knife cut off the top half to make a "bowl".

The "How Do I Feed 2 People?" Question:

Many of the recipes are listed as feeding two people, which might make one wonder, how do you feed 2 our of 1 bag? My answer to this has to been to bring two bags with me - an extra bag (usually recycled from having held dry food before). After the meal is ready, I do the final stirring, then divide the meal between the two bags.

Not Into Freezer Bags, But You Want To Do The Recipes?
    •    See the section on the one pot method.
    •    See the section on insulated mugs.
    •    Gladware®, Rubbermaid Take-A-Longs®, or Rubbermaid® food containers that have a lid. If it is dishwasher safe, you can use it. These can be put in soft sided cozies.
    •    Roasting bags and slow cooker liner bags, found in the plastic bag section.
    •    Food Vac bags, that are rated to be submerged in boiling water for extended periods of time are some of the strongest bags on the market.
    •    'Boil-In-Bags'
    •    Fozzil Dishes
    •    Orikaso Dishes

Healthy Bannock: A Quick, Easy Multi-grain Survival Food

Posted on June 22nd, 2010 by Leon in Food and Cooking


by Leon Pantenburg

Some useful, very basic, recipes should be included any prepper/survival/ Bug Out backpack. It’s one thing to have staples, such as flour, but another to be able to consume them. And you need some very simple recipes for those times when you might only have a few ingredients.

After posting some emergency survival recipes for flour last week, I whipped up some bannock to make sandwiches for a spur-of-the-moment hike.

Sitting in the shadow of Monkey Face, in Central Oregon’s magnificent Smith Rock State Park, eating my delicious bannock and turkey sandwich, I thought about how happy I was to be there!  (The trail across the top of the rock formations is the appropriately-named “Misery Trail” and I’d had a knee replacement in September, 2009!) It also occurred to me, how easy it would be to tweak the bannock recipe to make it more healthy and nutritious.

Bannock is the traditional bread of Canada and the Northwest. Native people had no access to wheat  flour prior to the arrival of European traders, although some flour substitutes existed, like wild turnips or corn, dried and ground to a powder.

 

Bannock actually originated in Scotland. Because bannock could be quickly prepared from readily-available ingredients, and because these ingredients lasted a long time without spoiling, bannock became a staple of European fur traders and subsequently, the native people also.

But the original recipe is nothing but flour and water, and traditional bannock is  essentially frontier junk food.

Here’s how to add a few ingredients to make flour-based  survival foods more nutritious.

Start by amending the  flour. Basic, white, bleached all-purpose flour has virtually all the nutrients taken out of it in processing. To each cup of white flour, add one tablespoon of soy flour, a tablespoon of dried milk and a teaspoon of wheat germ. According to “Classic Sourdoughs: A Home Baker’s Handbook” by Ed Wood, such an amendment combines enzymes and creates a complete protein, similar to meat.

I’ve used this amendment for years, and you can’t taste the difference in the baked goods. Try amending the flour in all your survival recipes that use white flour, such as hardtack, and you’ll feel the difference.  Here is the traditional bannock recipe:

Bannock recipe

1 c flour

4 tsp double-acting baking powder

2 Tbs powdered skim milk

Stir ingredients together; stir in water to make dough moist. Knead dough until smooth. Place in greased cast iron skillet or Dutch oven over the campfire or on coals and bake about five to 10 minutes until the top is brown. Then turn the bread and brown the other side.

A handy way to prepare for a backpacking or hiking trip is to mix all the dry ingredients in a Ziplock bag. Just add 1/2 cup of water and knead in the bag. Then take out the dough, finish kneading and spread it in the pan.

(Practice baking the bannock by the campfire. Put the dough in a greased skillet, and place it near the campfire, propped at about a 60-degree angle with a stick. Lodge Pro-Logic 10″ Skillet Preaseasoned
When the side nearest the fire browns, flip the bread and brown the other side. In a pinch you could bake it on a plank!)

 

SurvivalCommonSense Bannock Recipe

1/8 tsp salt

1 Tbs soy flour

1 tsp buckwheat flour

1 Tbs flax meal

2 Tbs stone ground whole wheat flour

4 tsp double-acting baking powder

Pace all the above ingredients in a one cup measure and add enough unbleached bread flour to make one cup of dry ingredients in volume.  Add  2 Tbs powdered skim milk, and stir until thoroughly mixed.

Add enough moisture to make a moist dough, and knead until smooth. Place in a greased cast iron skillet and bake. If you’re making this inside, bake at 425 degrees for about 20 minutes.

Except for the different ingredients, you can treat the improved recipe just like the traditional. Put the improved bannock mixture in a ziplock bag to make later on the trail, and you can cook it just like the traditional recipe.

With either recipe, bannock is a quick, easy way to make use of wheat flour. Both recipes are good survival tools that could prove to be really useful in your survival kit!

Healthy Hudson Bay Bread

Posted on December 18th, 2009 by Leon in Food and Cooking

by Leon Pantenburg

The only item on the lunch menu the first day was a three-inch square of Hudson Bay Bread gobbed with about two tablespoons of peanut butter. I’d worked up quite an appetite paddling and portaging that morning, and privately wondered where I’d get the energy to last the rest of the day.

My oldest son, Dan, and I, along with seven other members of Boy Scout Troop 18 of Bend, Oregon, had just started on a nine-day canoe trip through the Boundary Waters in northern Minnesota. We left from the Boy Scouts Northern Tier High Adventure base at Ely, Minn., and all the food, cooking gear and a guide were supplied.

To my surprise, the Hudson Bay bread was so rich, filling and full of calories that I could barely finish it. I had ample energy to paddle, portage and hike until that evening. There’s no question that the folks at the High Adventure base know how to fuel hungry paddlers!

Since that canoe journey in 2004, Hudson Bay bread has been put on my short list for high-energy, low-weight outdoor activity fuel. But being a freelance food writer, as well as somewhat of a health nut, I tweaked the recipe to make it a healthier food item.

Regardless of the recipe, one way to use the bread is to cut it into three-inch squares and put it into individual sandwich bags. For convenience, get peanut butter in one-ounce packets or fruit jam, and use that as a topping.

I assume the bread would last for several months, but don’t really know since it gets eaten too soon to find out!

Here’s the recipe for the bread given out by the High Adventure base at Ely. My suggestions for substitutions may change the flavor somewhat, but you’ll still get the nutritional punch needed for hiking, biking or any activity that burns a lot of calories.

HUDSON BAY BREAD

1-1/2 lbs. margarine or butter (Butter, always!)

4 cups of sugar (substitute raw, unrefined evaporated cane sugar)

2/3 cup Karo syrup (use maple syrup or blackstrap molasses. Get rid of the empty calorie refined corn syrup and add extra iron with molasses.)

2/3 cup honey

2 tsp. maple flavoring (If you use pure maple syrup, you don’t need this artifical additive.)

Cream together the above ingredients.

Add while mixing:

1-1/2 cups of ground nuts (Almonds can supply additional potassium)

19 cups of oatmeal (use steel cut or the kind you have to cook. The less refined the grain, the more nutrition).

Spread in a large sheet pan. Press it down into the pan. Bake at 325 degrees in a wind (or convection) oven for 15-18 minutes. As soon as the bread has been taken from the oven, use a spatula to press it down again. This presses the bread together to keep it from crumbling.

Cut it while still warm. For home-size preparation, cut this recipe at least in half. A conventional oven requires a longer baking time.

Include Simple Flour Recipes In Your Survival Kit

Posted on June 15th, 2010 by Leon in Food and Cooking

By Leon Pantenburg

Good, practical recipes can help you make the most efficient use of basic food staples in a survival situation!

One my best learning experiences was serving a year in VISTA on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Macy, Nebraska. The experience was life-changing for me, and stories of the rez would fill a book! My Omaha friends and I delighted in our cultural differences, but when it came to food we all loved the traditional Omaha dishes of corn soup, beans and fry bread.

Here’s the story I was told about the food: As the Omahas were forced onto reservations in the late 1870s, they were also forced into survival mode. The people would be issued monthly rations of flour, beans, parched corn or cornmeal and, if they were lucky, a few cattle. That would be it until the next distribution.

So the Omahas and other tribes created recipes to use the government-issued food. Beans were simmered with salt pork. Parched corn became the basis of corn soup, along with some sort of meat. Fry bread only had three ingredients.

My friend, Norma Leigh Dixon, made the best fry bread. She laughed when I asked for the recipe.

“What recipe?” she said. “You just mix flour, baking powder and water and fry it. That’s why it’s called fry bread!”

Some useful recipes should be included any prepper/survival/ Bug Out backpack. It’s one thing to have staples, such as flour, but another to be able to consume them. What happens during a survival situation, when you end up with a bag of flour, some baking powder, a campfire and hungry children?

You could eat flour out of the bag, I suppose. Or, you could mix it with water and make a sort of pasty gruel. But you’d have to be really hungry to choke that mess down, and at some point, the youngsters might just quit eating.

One way to make the best use of basic food staples is to have good recipes! Here are a couple of suggestions to make flour and water into a more tasty survival ration.

Bannock is the traditional bread of Canada and the Northwest. Native people had no access to flour prior to the arrival of European traders, although some flour substitutes existed, like wild turnips or corn, dried and ground to a powder.

Bannock actually originated in Scotland. Because bannock could be quickly prepared from readily available ingredients, and because these ingredients lasted a long time without spoiling, bannock became a staple of European fur traders and subsequently, the native people also.

Bannock recipe

1 c flour

4 tsp double-acting baking powder

2 Tbs powdered skim milk

Stir ingredients together; stir in water to make dough moist. Knead dough until smooth. Place in greased cast iron skillet or Dutch oven and bake it about five to 10 minutes over the campfire or on coals until it is brown on the bottom, then flip it, and brown the other side.

A handy way to prepare for a backpacking or hiking trip is to mix all the dry ingredients in a Ziplock bag. Just add 1/2 cup water and knead in the bag. Then take out the dough, finish kneading and spread it in the pan.

(Practice baking the bannock by the campfire. Put the dough in a greased skillet, and place it near the campfire, propped at about a 60-degree angle with a stick. Lodge Pro-Logic 10″ Skillet Preaseasoned
When the side nearest the fire browns, flip the bread and brown the other side. In a pinch you could bake it on a plank!)

Fry Bread

To quote my friend Norma Leigh: “What recipe?” Use essentially the same combination of ingredients as for bannock, and fry in hot oil in a Dutch oven or skillet. Brown on both sides and serve hot.

Hardtack

Hardtack is one of the original trail and emergency foods. Hardtack is simple to make, transports easily and will last a reasonably long time if stored in plastic bags or containers. The disadvantage is the bland taste, and traditional toughness.  (It only takes a few additional ingredients to turbocharge  the nutritional value of hardtack. To each cup of flour in the recipe, add one tablespoon of soy flour, one teaspoon of wheat germ and one teaspoon of powdered milk. There is no difference in the taste, and these ingredients combine to make the bread a complete protein.)

Hardtack Recipe

Ingredients:

 4 cups flour (preferably whole wheat)

 4 teaspoons salt

 Water (about 2 cups)

 Pre-heat oven to 375° F

 Makes about 10 pieces

Mix the flour and salt together in a bowl. Add just enough water (less than two cups) so that the mixture will stick together, producing a dough that won’t stick to hands, rolling pin or pan. Mix the dough by hand. Roll the dough out, shaping it roughly into a rectangle. Cut into the dough into squares about 3 x 3 inches and ½ inch thick.

After cutting the squares, press a pattern of four rows of four holes into each square, using a nail or other such object. Do not punch through the dough. The appearance you want is similar to that of a modern saltine cracker.  Turn each square over and do the same thing to the other side.

Place the squares on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 30 minutes. The crackers should be slightly brown on both sides.

The fresh crackers are easily broken, but as they dry, they harden.

Multi-Grain Biscuit Mix Provides Great Survival Food

Posted on August 6th, 2010 by Leon in Food and Cooking

by Leon Pantenburg

Good recipes for stored staples may be one of your most useful survival tools.

Preppers, survivalists and other prepared people know that keeping your family fed during an emergency is a priority. But over the long haul, monotony in your diet can end up being a problem. Eating the same food, day after day, may eventually cause the kids or the old folks to quit eating.  Without proper nutrition, you and your family won’t do well!

While it’s a great idea to stock up on wheat berries, flour, rice, beans, cooking oil and other staples, you better have some ideas on how to use these staples!

If biscuits and gravy are a favorite breakfast treat, then nobody has to sell you on the idea of baking biscuits in the morning.

We’re not talking about those that originate in a refrigerated tube, of course, but the real thing, made from scratch. But most people don’t need another time-sucker in their morning routine, nor in the dinner routine, when a quick side dish to go with a stew, chowder or soup is required.

What you do need is a quick, easy way to make biscuits, pancakes, waffles and more. While there are numerous mixes

on the market that store well, they may be little more than flour, salt, baking powder and water. It’s easy, and a lot cheaper, to make your own biscuit and pancake mix out of ingredients you know will provide healthy, solid nutrition.

During my 2,552-mile Mississippi River canoe trip, my standard breakfast was usually as many pancakes as I could eat, drowned in maple syrup and butter. This meal fueled several hours of rowing, and provided the energy to battle bad weather, cold temperatures, wind and contrary river currents!

In the U.S., a biscuit is a small form of bread made with baking powder or baking soda as a leavening agent rather than yeast. Biscuits, soda breads and corn bread are sometimes referred to as quick breads to indicate they don’t need time to rise before baking. Sweet variations of the biscuit are sometimes called scones.

Add more liquid and maybe an egg and some oil to a standard biscuit recipe, and it becomes a pancake batter. A little more egg and you have the makings of a waffle. (A quick note: Learning how to cook over a campfire in a cast iron Dutch oven is an important survival skill! Lodge Dutch Ovens )

Since they’re all quick breads, the main difference between most biscuits, pancakes, waffles and even dumplings is the amount of liquid added and the method of cooking. A good biscuit mix should be able to accommodate most of these recipes.

For best results, use a double-acting leavening agent in your biscuit mix.

Single-acting baking powders are activated by moisture, so recipes with this product must be baked immediately after mixing. Double-acting powders react in two phases and can stand for a while before baking. With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to the dough or batter, but the majority of the gas is released after the temperature of the dough increases in the oven or on the griddle.

For biscuits, add just enough water to milk to create a soft dough, knead lightly, roll or pat flat and cut out rounds. If a touch of extra liquid is added, the dough’s texture changes to resemble very stiff pancake batter, so that small spoonfuls can be dropped onto the baking sheet to produce drop biscuits, which are more creative in texture and shape.

For pancakes or waffles, mix the wet ingredients first, then add the mix to the liquid and stir briefly. Over mixing will result in tougher cakes, so it’s ok to leave lumps. Let the batter sit for a few minutes before pouring by 1/4 – to 13-cupfuls onto a hot griddle or waffle iron.

Few items in your baking pantry will be as versatile as a good biscuit mix. Here’s a recipe I’ve been using for a long time, and over the years, the ingredients have been tweaked to make it a healthy food. A batch goes along  to elk and  deer camp every year and it provides the basis for several side dishes.


Healthy Biscuit Mix

5 lbs All-Purpose flour, minus 4 C

3 C whole wheat flour

1 C flax meal

1 C soy flour

2½ C dry milk

¾ C double-acting baking powder

3 TBS salt

5 TBS wheat germ

½ C unrefined cane sugar

2 TBS cream of tartar

4 C shortening

Combine first six ingredients in a large bowl, and stir well. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal. Store at room temperature in an airtight container.

(Backpackers, hunters and outdoors people can also take along a few scoops in a plastic bag. Come mealtime, it can be cooked like a bannock next to a campfire. I don’t really know how how long the completed mix will last, since we go through it  pretty quickly. I would imagine the shelf life would be about six months or so.)

Biscuits

1 heaping C Healthy Biscuit mix

About 3 TBS water

Combine mix and enough water to form a soft dough in a mixing bowl. Shape into a ball, knead about 10 times on a lightly floured surface. (Don’t overknead or the biscuits will be tough.) Flatten out and roll or pat to ½-inch thickness. Cut dough into biscuits, put on a greased cookie sheet or in a greased cast iron skillet. Bake at 400 degrees for about 25 minutes or until browned. Yields 5 biscuits.


Pancakes

½ C milk

1 egg

1 TBS vegetable oil

1 C Healthy Biscuit mix

Combine first three ingredients, blend well. Add biscuit mix, stir until smooth. (If thicker batter is desired, add more flour.) Drop batter on lightly greased hot griddle, and cook until pancakes are browned on both sides. Yields about five 4-inch pancakes.

Dumplings

2 C basic biscuit mix

2/3 C milk

Mix together until a soft dough forms, then drop by spoonfuls onto a boiling stew. Cook uncovered for 10 minutes, then cover and cook another 10 minutes. Makes about 10 dumplings.

Basic Biscuit mix

This recipe is pretty standard throughout the south. It works well if you don’t have a lot of other amendment ingredients available.

10 C All-Purpose flour

1/3 C baking powder

1 TBS salt

2 C shortening

Sift flour, baking powder, and salt together in a large bowl. With two knives or a pastry blender, add the shortening in spoonfuls and cut it in until the mixture is the texture of coarse cornmeal. Keep mix stored in a labeled, tightly closed container. It will keep on the pantry shelf for up to six months in dry weather. In hot or humid weather, it is a good idea to refrigerate the mix.

Yields about 10 cups of mix.

FOR LIKE MINDED PATRIOTS WHO WANT TO SURVIVE ANY AND ALL SITUATIONS THAT THEY MAY FACE.