Make your own free website on Tripod.com

POISONOUS PLANTS

Home
10 THINGS TO DO NOW
10 MORE THINGS TO DO NOW
50 WAYS TO PREPARE FOR SURVIVAL
54 GRUNT TIPS & TACTICS FOR YOUR TOOLBOX WHEN THE SHTF
72 HOUR DISASTER KIT
100 MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS YOU WILL NEED WHEN THE SHIT HITS THE FAN
A MAGIC BULLET WILL BE NEEDED TO KILL THE 17TH AMENDMENT
ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAINING FOR CITIZENS
AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
BASIC EMERGENCY SUPPLY LIST WITH BUG-OUT VEHICLE INFORMATION
BOWHUNTING CHECKLIST
BUG-OUT-BAG (B.O.B.)
CERT DISASTER RESPONSE GEAR AND PACKING LIST
COMBAT LEADER'S HANDBOOK PART 1
COMBAT LEADER'S HANDBOOK PART 2
COMBAT PATROLS
COMMITTEE OF SAFETY - COMMON LAW COURT
COMMITTEE OF SAFETY -THE END OF THE REVOLUTION AND THE BEGINNING OF INDEPENDENCE
COMMITTEE OF SAFETY - THE PLAN FOR THE RESTORATION OF CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT
COMMUNICATIONS
CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTIONS - WHY THEY WILL NOT WORK
COVER, CONCEALMENT AND CAMOUFLAGE
CLOSE QUARTERS BATTLE - TIRE IRON STYLE
CROSSING A LINEAR DANGER AREA - TIRE IRON STYLE
DANGER AREA TACTICS
THREAT LEVEL AND DEPLOYMENT STATUS
DISASTER PREPAREDNESS GUIDES
FIELD GEAR PACKING LIST INCLUDING FIELD STOVES AND FUEL
FIGHTING POSITIONS
FILE DOWNLOAD AREA
FIREMEN
FIRE STARTING AND TINDER OPTIONS
FOOD - 3 & 6 DAY SAMPLE MENU'S
FOOD - BACK COUNTRY COOKING INFORMATION AND RECIPIES
FOOD - BACKPACKING NUTRITION INFORMATION
SPICES TO STOCK UP ON
FOOD - EDIBLE AND MEDICINAL PLANTS
FOOD - EDIBLE WILD FOODS
FOOD - LOW MAINTENANCE ANIMALS THAT WORK FOR YOU: CHICKENS, RABBITS AND GOATS
FOOD - MILITIA COOKBOOK AND MORE RECIPIES
FOOD - STORAGE AND SUPPLIES
FOOD - THE SURVIVAL FOOD PYRAMID
FREEDOM FROM WAR BY PRESIDENT JOHN KENNEDY TO THE UNITED NATIONS - 1961
GRUB & GEAR - LESSONS LEARNED FROM AN ALASKAN TRAPPER
HAND & ARM SIGNALS
HAZARDS AND DISASTERS THAT CAN HAPPEN IN MAINE
HOW TO TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A LIBERAL AND A CONSERVATIVE
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION
IMMEDIATE ACTION DRILLS (ACTIONS ON ENEMY CONTACT)
INITIAL ENTRY TRAINING
ISRAELI STREET FIGHTING TIPS
LAND NAVIGATION
LINKS OF INTEREST
MAP READING
MEDICAL - A DOCTOR'S THOUGHTS ON ANTIBIOTICS, EXPIRATION DATES, AND TEOTWAWKI
MEDICAL - BLOOD TYPE COMPATABILITY CHART
MEDICAL - COMBAT LIFESAVERS MEDICAL BAG
MEDICAL - COMBAT LIFESAVER TRAINING MATERIALS
MEDICAL - CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INFECTION AND TREATMENT
MEDICAL - DIY WATER FILTERS AND OTHER PURIFICATION METHODS FOR FIELD USE
MEDICAL - FIRST AID TRAINING STANDARDS FOR THE MILITIA MEMBER
MEDICAL - GIARDIA INFECTION AND TREATMENT
MEDICAL - HEAT INDEX CHART
MEDICAL - HERBAL MEDICINE FOR PREPPERS
MEDICAL - INSERTING AN ORAL AIRWAY
MEDICAL - IV THERAPY
MEDICAL - MEDICINE AND NURSING DISCUSSION
MEDICAL - MEDICINE AND SECURITY DISCUSSION
MEDICAL - MILITIA MEDIC TRAINING SUBJECTS
MEDICAL - PLANTS FOR MEDICINE
MEDICAL - PSYCH NURSING DISCUSSION
MEDICAL - RANGER FIRST RESPONDER TRAINING SLIDES
MEDICAL - TACTICAL & LONG RANGE MEDICAL GUIDELINES
MEDICAL - TACTICAL MEDICAL KIT
MEDICAL - THE MEDIC CODE
MEDICAL - TRAUMA DISCUSSION
MEDICAL - TRAUMA FOCUSED INDIVIDUAL TRAINING SLIDES & TACTICAL COMBAT CASUALTY CARE
MEDICAL - WATER INTAKE REQUIREMENTS TO PREVENT HEAT INJURIES AND DEHYDRATION
MEDICAL - WINDCHILL CHART
MISSION PLANNING: Step 1 Strategic goals
MISSION PLANNING: Step 2 Missions and the SG's
MISSION PLANNING: Step 3 Tactical Planning an overview
MISSION PLANNING: Step 4 Warning Order Part 1
MISSION PLANNING: Step 5 SMEAC
MISSION PLANNING: Step 6 Mission Statement
MISSION PLANNING: Step 7
MISSION PLANNING: Step 8 Finalized Situation Report.
MISSION PLANNING: Step 9 The meat of the whole deal - EXECUTION
MISSION PLANNING: Step 9a The general make up of the team
MISSION PLANNING: Step 9b Planning for the HOME Team deployment
MISSION PLANNING: Step 9b (a) LR Execution
MISSION PLANNING: Step 9c Home Team Insertions
MOUNTED LAND NAVIGATION
MOVEMENT TECHNIQUES
NAVIGATION IN DIFFERENT TYPE OF TERRAIN
OBSERVATION POSTS AND SCANNING
PATROL BASES
PATROL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS
PATROLLING 101 - TIRE IRON STYLE
POISONOUS PLANTS
PROCEEDINGS OF COMMISSIONERS TO REMEDY DEFECTS OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT : 1786
RECONNISSANCE PATROLS
ROBERT ROGER'S STANDING ORDERS
RON PAUL AND THE MILITIA
SEARCH AND RESCUE - FEMA TYPE RATING
SEARCH AND RESCUE - WINTER OPERATIONS EQUIPMENT LIST
SURVIVAL
SURVIVAL FOR OMNIVORES, VEGETARIANS, AND VEGANS
SURVIVAL GARDENING
SURVIVAL IN THE CITY
TEAM FORMATIONS - FM 7-8 STYLE
TEAM FORMATIONS - TIRE IRON STYLE
THE ANTI-FEDERALIST PAPERS 1-17
THE ANTI-FEDERALIST PAPERS 18-34
THE ANTI-FEDERALIST PAPERS 35-51
THE ANTI-FEDERALIST PAPERS 52-68
THE ANTI-FEDERALIST PAPERS 69-85
THE ART OF WAR - Part I - Laying Plans
THE ART OF WAR - Part II - Waging War
THE ART OF WAR - Part III - Attack By Stratagem
THE ART OF WAR - Part IV - Tactical Dispositions
THE ART OF WAR - Part V - Energy
THE ART OF WAR - Part VI - Weak Points and Strong
THE ART OF WAR - Part VII - Maneuvering
THE ART OF WAR - Part VIII - Variation in Tactics
THE ART OF WAR - Part IX - The Army on the March
THE ART OF WAR - Part X - Terrain
THE ART OF WAR - Part XI - The Nine Situations
THE ART OF WAR - Part XII - The Attack by Fire
THE ART OF WAR - Part XIII - The Use of Spies
THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION: MARCH 1, 1781
THE BILL OF RIGHTS
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES
THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - The Importance of the Union (1-14)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - Defects of the Articles of Confederation (15-22)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - Arguments for the Type of Government Contained in the Constitution (23-36)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - The Republican Form of Government (37-51)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - The Legislative Branch (52-66)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - The Executive Branch (67-77)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - The Judicial Branch (78-83)
THE FEDERALIST PAPERS - Conclusions and Miscellaneous Ideas (84-85)
THE MYTH OF POSSE COMITATUS ACT OF 1878
TRACKING PATROL
URBAN OPERATIONS
WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
WEAPONS QUALIFICATION
WHAT IS THE MILITIA
WRITTEN EXAMS
YouHaveTreadOnMe - Radio Show

HOW PLANTS POISON

Plants generally poison by--

  • Ingestion. When a person eats a part of a poisonous plant.
  • Contact. When a person makes contact with a poisonous plant that causes any type of skin irritation or dermatitis.
  • Absorption or inhalation. When a person either absorbs the poison through the skin or inhales it into the respiratory system.

Plant poisoning ranges from minor irritation to death. A common question asked is, "How poisonous is this plant?" It is difficult to say how poisonous plants are because--

  • Some plants require contact with a large amount of the plant before noticing any adverse reaction while others will cause death with only a small amount.
  • Every plant will vary in the amount of toxins it contains due to different growing conditions and slight variations in subspecies.
  • Every person has a different level of resistance to toxic substances.
  • Some persons may be more sensitive to a particular plant.

Some common misconceptions about poisonous plants are--

  • Watch the animals and eat what they eat. Most of the time this statement is true, but some animals can eat plants that are poisonous to humans.
  • Boil the plant in water and any poisons will be removed. Boiling removes many poisons, but not all.
  • Plants with a red color are poisonous. Some plants that are red are poisonous, but not all.

The point is there is no one rule to aid in identifying poisonous plants. You must make an effort to learn as much about them as possible.

ALL ABOUT PLANTS

It is to your benefit to learn as much about plants as possible. Many poisonous plants look like their edible relatives or like other edible plants. For example, poison hemlock appears very similar to wild carrot. Certain plants are safe to eat in certain seasons or stages of growth and poisonous in other stages. For example, the leaves of the pokeweed are edible when it first starts to grow, but it soon becomes poisonous. You can eat some plants and their fruits only when they are ripe. For example, the ripe fruit of mayapple is edible, but all other parts and the green fruit are poisonous. Some plants contain both edible and poisonous parts; potatoes and tomatoes are common plant foods, but their green parts are poisonous.

Some plants become toxic after wilting. For example, when the black cherry starts to wilt, hydrocyanic acid develops. Specific preparation methods make some plants edible that are poisonous raw. You can eat the thinly sliced and thoroughly dried corms (drying may take a year) of the jack-in-the-pulpit, but they are poisonous if not thoroughly dried.

Learn to identify and use plants before a survival situation. Some sources of information about plants are pamphlets, books, films, nature trails, botanical gardens, local markets, and local natives. Gather and cross-reference information from as many sources as possible, because many sources will not contain all the information needed.

RULES FOR AVOIDING POISONOUS PLANTS

Your best policy is to be able to look at a plant and identify it with absolute certainty and to know its uses or dangers. Many times this is not possible. If you have little or no knowledge of the local vegetation, use the rules to select plants for the "Universal Edibility Test." Remember, avoid --

  • All mushrooms. Mushroom identification is very difficult and must be precise, even more so than with other plants. Some mushrooms cause death very quickly. Some mushrooms have no known antidote. Two general types of mushroom poisoning are gastrointestinal and central nervous system.
  • Contact with or touching plants unnecessarily.

CONTACT DERMATITIS

Contact dermatitis from plants will usually cause the most trouble in the field. The effects may be persistent, spread by scratching, and are particularly dangerous if there is contact in or around the eyes.

The principal toxin of these plants is usually an oil that gets on the skin upon contact with the plant. The oil can also get on equipment and then infect whoever touches the equipment. Never bum a contact poisonous plant because the smoke may be as harmful as the plant. There is a greater danger of being affected when overheated and sweating. The infection may be local or it may spread over the body.

Symptoms may take from a few hours to several days to appear. Signs and symptoms can include burning, reddening, itching, swelling, and blisters.

When you first contact the poisonous plants or the first symptoms appear, try to remove the oil by washing with soap and cold water. If water is not available, wipe your skin repeatedly with dirt or sand. Do not use dirt if blisters have developed. The dirt may break open the blisters and leave the body open to infection. After you have removed the oil, dry the area. You can wash with a tannic acid solution and crush and rub jewelweed on the affected area to treat plant-caused rashes. You can make tannic acid from oak bark.

Poisonous plants that cause contact dermatitis are--

  • Cowhage.
  • Poison ivy.
  • Poison oak.
  • Poison sumac.
  • Rengas tree.
  • Trumpet vine.

INGESTION POISONING

Ingestion poisoning can be very serious and could lead to death very quickly. Do not eat any plant unless you have positively identified it first. Keep a log of all plants eaten.

Signs and symptoms of ingestion poisoning can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, depressed heartbeat and respiration, headaches, hallucinations, dry mouth, unconsciousness, coma, and death.

If you suspect plant poisoning, try to remove the poisonous material from the victim's mouth and stomach as soon as possible. Induce vomiting by tickling the back of his throat or by giving him warm saltwater, if he is conscious. Dilute the poison by administering large quantities of water or milk, if he is conscious.

The following plants can cause ingestion poisoning if eaten:

  • Castor bean.
  • Chinaberry.
  • Death camas.
  • Lantana.
  • Manchineel.
  • Oleander.
  • Pangi.
  • Physic nut.
  • Poison and water hemlocks.
  • Rosary pea.
  • Strychnine tree.

Castor bean, castor-oil plant, palma Christi

Castor bean, castor-oil plant, palma Christi 
Ricinus communis 
Spurge (Euphorbiaceae) Family


Description: The castor bean is a semiwoody plant with large, alternate, starlike leaves that grows as a tree in tropical regions and as an annual in temperate regions. Its flowers are very small and inconspicuous. Its fruits grow in clusters at the tops of the plants.

CAUTION

All parts of the plant are very poisonous to eat. The seeds are large and may be mistaken for a beanlike food.

Habitat and Distribution: This plant is found in all tropical regions and has been introduced to temperate regions.

Chinaberry

Chinaberry 
Melia azedarach 
Mahogany (Meliaceae) Family


Description: This tree has a spreading crown and grows up to 14 meters tall. It has alternate, compound leaves with toothed leaflets. Its flowers are light purple with a dark center and grow in ball-like masses. It has marble-sized fruits that are light orange when first formed but turn lighter as they become older.

CAUTION

All parts of the tree should be considered dangerous if eaten. Its leaves are a natural insecticide and will repel insects from stored fruits and grains. Take care not to eat leaves mixed with the stored food.

Habitat and Distribution: Chinaberry is native to the Himalayas and eastern Asia but is now planted as an ornamental tree throughout the tropical and subtropical regions. It has been introduced to the southern United States and has escaped to thickets, old fields, and disturbed areas.

Cowhage, cowage, cowitch

Cowhage, cowage, cowitch 
Mucuna pruritum 
Leguminosae (Fabaceae) Family


Description: A vinelike plant that has oval leaflets in groups of three and hairy spikes with dull purplish flowers. The seeds are brown, hairy pods.

CAUTION

Contact with the pods and flowers causes irritation and blindness if in the eyes.

Habitat and Distribution: Tropical areas and the United States.

Death camas, death lily

Death camas, death lily 
Zigadenus species 
Lily (Liliaceae) Family


Description: This plant arises from a bulb and may be mistaken for an onionlike plant. Its leaves are grasslike. Its flowers are six-parted and the petals have a green, heart-shaped structure on them. The flowers grow on showy stalks above the leaves.

CAUTION

All parts of this plant are very poisonous. Death camas does not have the onion smell.

Habitat and Distribution: Death camas is found in wet, open, sunny habitats, although some species favor dry, rocky slopes. They are common in parts of the western United States. Some species are found in the eastern United States and in parts of the North American western subarctic and eastern Siberia.

Lantana

Lantana 
Lantana camara 
Vervain (Verbenaceae) Family


Description: Lantana is a shrublike plant that may grow up to 45 centimeters high. It has opposite, round leaves and flowers borne in flat-topped clusters. The flower color (which varies in different areas) may be white, yellow, orange, pink, or red. It has a dark blue or black berrylike fruit. A distinctive feature of all parts of this plant is its strong scent.

CAUTION

All parts of this plant are poisonous if eaten and can be fatal. This plant causes dermatitis in some individuals.

Habitat and Distribution: Lantana is grown as an ornamental in tropical and temperate areas and has escaped cultivation as a weed along roads and old fields.

Manchineel

Manchineel 
Hippomane mancinella 
Spurge (Euphorbiaceae) Family


Description: Manchineel is a tree reaching up to 15 meters high with alternate, shiny green leaves and spikes of small greenish flowers. Its fruits are green or greenish-yellow when ripe.

CAUTION

This tree is extremely toxic. It causes severe dermatitis in most individuals after only .5 hour. Even water dripping from the leaves may cause dermatitis. The smoke from burning it irritates the eyes. No part of this plant should be considered a food.

Habitat and Distribution: The tree prefers coastal regions. Found in south Florida, the Caribbean, Central America, and northern South America.

Oleander

Oleander 
Nerium oleander 
Dogbane (Apocynaceae) Family


Description: This shrub or small tree grows to about 9 meters, with alternate, very straight, dark green leaves. Its flowers may be white, yellow, red, pink, or intermediate colors. Its fruit is a brown, podlike structure with many small seeds.

CAUTION

All parts of the plant are very poisonous. Do not use the wood for cooking; it gives off poisonous fumes that can poison food.

Habitat and Distribution: This native of the Mediterranean area is now grown as an ornamental in tropical and temperate regions.

Pangi

Pangi 
Pangium edule 
Pangi Family


Description: This tree, with heart-shaped leaves in spirals, reaches a height of 18 meters. Its flowers grow in spikes and are green in color. Its large, brownish, pear-shaped fruits grow in clusters.

CAUTION

All parts are poisonous, especially the fruit.

Habitat and Distribution: Pangi trees grow in southeast Asia

Physic nut

Physic nut 
Jatropha curcas 
Spurge (Euphoriaceae) Family


Description: This shrub or small tree has large, 3- to 5-parted alternate leaves. It has small, greenish-yelllow flowers and its yellow, apple-sized fruits contain three large seeds.

CAUTION

The seeds taste sweet but their oil is violently purgative. All parts of the physic nut are poisonous.

Habitat and Distribution: Throughout the tropics and southern United States.

Poison hemlock, fool's parsley

Poison hemlock, fool's parsley 
Conium maculatum 
Parsley (Apiaceae) Family


Description: This biennial herb may grow to 2.5 meters high. The smooth, hollow stem may or may not be purple or red striped or mottled. Its white flowers are small and grow in small groups that tend to form flat umbels. Its long, turniplike taproot is solid.

CAUTION

This plant is very poisonous and even a very small amount may cause death. This plant is easy to confuse with wild carrot or Queen Anne's lace, especially in its first stage of growth. Wild carrot or Queen Anne's lace has hairy leaves and stems and smells like carrot. Poison hemlock does not.

Habitat and Distribution: Poison hemlock grows in wet or moist ground like swamps, wet meadows, stream banks, and ditches. Native to Eurasia, it has been introduced to the United States and Canada.

Poison ivy and poison oak

Poison ivy and poison oak 
Toxicodendron radicans and Toxicodendron diversibba 
Cashew (Anacardiacese) Family


Description: These two plants are quite similar in appearance and will often crossbreed to make a hybrid. Both have alternate, compound leaves with three leaflets. The leaves of poison ivy are smooth or serrated. Poison oak's leaves are lobed and resemble oak leaves. Poison ivy grows as a vine along the ground or climbs by red feeder roots. Poison oak grows like a bush. The greenish-white flowers are small and inconspicuous and are followed by waxy green berries that turn waxy white or yellow, then gray.

CAUTION

All parts, at all times of the year, can cause serious contact dermatitis.

Habitat and Distribution: Poison ivy and oak can be found in almost any habitat in North America.

Poison sumac

Poison sumac 
Toxicodendron vernix 
Cashew (Anacardiacese) Family


Description: Poison sumac is a shrub that grows to 8.5 meters tall. It has alternate, pinnately compound leafstalks with 7 to 13 leaflets. Flowers are greenish-yellow and inconspicuous and are followed by white or pale yellow berries.

CAUTION

All parts can cause serious contact dermatitis at all times of the year.

Habitat and Distribution: Poison sumac grows only in wet, acid swamps in North America.

 

Renghas tree, rengas tree, marking nut, black-varnish tree 
Gluta 
Cashew (Anacardiacese) Family


Description: This family comprises about 48 species of trees or shrubs with alternating leaves in terminal or axillary panicles. Flowers are similar to those of poison ivy and oak.

CAUTION

Can cause contact dermatitis similar to poison ivy and oak.

Habitat and Distribution: India, east to Southeast Asia.

Rosary pea or crab's eyes

Rosary pea or crab's eyes 
Abrus precatorius 
Leguminosae (Fabaceae) Family


Description: This plant is a vine with alternate compound leaves, light purple flowers, and beautiful seeds that are red and black.

CAUTION

This plant is one of the most dangerous plants. One seed may contain enough poison to kill an adult.

Habitat and Distribution: This is a common weed in parts of Africa, southern Florida, Hawaii, Guam, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Strychnine tree

Strychnine tree 
Nux vomica 
Logania (Loganiaceae) Family


Description: The strychnine tree is a medium-sized evergreen, reaching a height of about 12 meters, with a thick, frequently crooked trunk. Its deeply veined oval leaves grow in alternate pairs. Small, loose clusters of greenish flowers appear at the ends of branches and are followed by fleshy, orange-red berries about 4 centimeters in diameter.

CAUTION

The berries contain the dislike seeds that yield the poisonous substance strychnine. All parts of the plant are poisonous.

Habitat and Distribution: A native of the tropics and subtropics of southeastern Asia and Australia.

Trumpet vine or trumpet creeper

Trumpet vine or trumpet creeper 
Campsis radicans 
Trumpet creeper (Bignoniaceae) Family


Description: This woody vine may climb to 15 meters high. It has pealike fruit capsules. The leaves are pinnately compound, 7 to 11 toothed leaves per leaf stock. The trumpet-shaped flowers are orange to scarlet in color.

CAUTION

This plant causes contact dermatitis.

Habitat and Distribution: This vine is found in wet woods and thickets throughout eastern and central North America.

Water hemlock or spotted cowbane

Water hemlock or spotted cowbane 
Cicuta maculata 
Parsley (Apiaceae) Family


Description: This perennial herb may grow to 1.8 meters high. The stem is hollow and sectioned off like bamboo. It may or may not be purple or red striped or mottled. Its flowers are small, white, and grow in groups that tend to form flat umbels. Its roots may have hollow air chambers and, when cut, may produce drops of yellow oil.

CAUTION

This plant is very poisonous and even a very small amount of this plant may cause death. Its roots have been mistaken for parsnips.

Habitat and Distribution: Water hemlock grows in wet or moist ground like swamps, wet meadows, stream banks, and ditches throughout the Unites States and Canada.

FOR LIKE MINDED PATRIOTS WHO WANT TO SURVIVE ANY AND ALL SITUATIONS THAT THEY MAY FACE.